"I’m doing this internship to make my parents happy. But as soon as I graduate, I’m heading to Bollywood!"

"I’m a traffic cop. It’s a job. Somebody’s got to do it. I don’t even represent myself when I’m working. If I was representing myself, I’d let everyone off with a warning. I represent a system. Did I design the system? No. I just enforce it. It’s not for me to decide the system. We elect the people who decide the system. When I write a ticket, everyone tells me a reason that they don’t deserve it. If I gave a warning to everyone with a reason, I wouldn’t give any tickets, and the system wouldn’t work. I don’t get any joy by giving a ticket. And I’m not upset if you beat it in court. It’s not personal. It’s my job."

"Are you lonely?"
"It’s been a lifetime of loneliness. I decided early on that I better get used to it. I go to movies by myself. If the movie theater is completely empty, I’m even happier. I learned early on that if I wanted to go to restaurants, I better learn to go by myself. One benefit to being big is that people don’t bother you. I’m shocked that you came up to me. Nobody’s ever done that. When I started to go to therapy, it took me several sessions before I even spoke a word. I’d just sit there and cry. And honestly, you caught me on a tough day. I was sitting here feeling really bad about myself. Because I went to the doctor today, and I was sure that I’d lost weight. But I’d gained some."

"I’ve struggled with my weight my whole life. When I was twenty-one, I decided I wanted to be skinny. I thought it was going to bring me love, happiness, everything I wanted. I barely ate. I exercised three times a day. I got down to 130 pounds and I was more miserable than ever. I hated myself. And after that I gave up on trying to be thin. Now I’ve gotten to the point where I have to lose weight again—- but this time for my health."

"I’ve struggled with my weight my whole life. When I was twenty-one, I decided I wanted to be skinny. I thought it was going to bring me love, happiness, everything I wanted. I barely ate. I exercised three times a day. I got down to 130 pounds and I was more miserable than ever. I hated myself. And after that I gave up on trying to be thin. Now I’ve gotten to the point where I have to lose weight again—- but this time for my health."

"In my heart of hearts, I wanted to do the right thing, but selling drugs was easy. Everyone was doing it. I mean, I’m not using that as an excuse, I made my own decisions. But I grew up around these Robin Hood figures who would sell drugs, then buy supplies for kids who were going back to school, or pay rent for an old woman who was about to get evicted. All my friends were doing it. It almost seemed fashionable. I never felt proud of it. I always thought I’d transition to a job with the Transit Authority, or a job like this— something I’d feel good about, but instead I transitioned to jail. I did six years. When I got out, it was tempting to go back to the easy money, because everyone around me was still doing it, and I couldn’t get a job. But luckily I found an agency that helps ex-cons, because there aren’t many companies looking to give people a second chance. I’ve had this job for a few years now. You know what product I’m selling now? Myself. Everyone around here is my client. Times Square is a drug to these people. And I’m picking up all the trash so that they can have the full Times Square experience."

"I’m a court reporter. He’s a judge. Office romance."

"I just want to stop working."

"My husband was an editor at the New York Times, so he’d work really late nights, and I’d sometimes get lonely. So I started letting this tomcat into our house everyday. But my husband was horribly allergic to cats, so right before he’d get home, I’d let the cat back out again. But one night it was raining so hard that I refused to let the cat out, and my husband stayed up all night sneezing. And that’s how I got a puppy!"

"What’s your greatest struggle right now?"
"The death of my husband."
"How’d you meet?"
"I was at a party on Fire Island, and this man walked in. I was about 25 at the time and recently divorced. I thought: ‘He looks interesting, I should get to know him.’ We ended up talking all night long. The next morning we were engaged, and two weeks later we were married."
"So what did he say when he asked you to marry him?"
"He didn’t really ask. He just said: ‘Let’s get married.’"

"We’re the Eco Adventure Club! Everyday we go on an adventure to learn about plants and animals in the city. Today is our eleventh adventure. We’ve been to Prospect Park, the Botanical Gardens, and today we’re learning to use maps on the High Line. We’re even growing our own garden. Everybody say Raaassstttaaaffaaarriii!"

Today in microfashion…

"He wants to go home."

"I want to make electronic music and perform in Japan. But it’s tough to stay motivated. At some point you forget your original intention, but you still have to keep doing it every day."
"What do you mean by ‘original intention?’"
"When you start something, your motivation comes from a really strong feeling of inspiration. As you go on, it gets harder and harder to remember that feeling."

"My friend came up to me and said: ‘Alfredo! There’s some guy over there jerking off in front of women and kids.’ So I ran up to this guy, and I said: ‘What the hell do you think you’re doing? Put your shit back in your pants and get the fuck out of the park!’ And he stood up, and he got in my face, and he started to say: ‘Fuck you!’ But after he said ‘fuck,’ and before he said ‘you,’ I clocked him right in the face and knocked him out. When the cops came, I told them the story, and they said: ‘You better get out of here before the boss gets here.’ So I left the park, but this guy’s tooth was lodged in my hand. And he had some sort of infection. Cause two days later, my legs swell up like balloons, and I’ve barely been able to walk since."

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