22 August 2014
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"He’s only five years old, but he acts like an old man. Just now, he was just telling us that he was tired of our immature jokes. He doesn’t even like to play. After school, he usually comes straight home and reads."

(Nairobi, Kenya)

22 August 2014
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"Her father and brother died in the same month. She developed a very bad problem in her head after that. For months, she would barely move. I was so worried about her that I took her to hospitals, and nothing worked. It was the hardest time of my life. But now she is better. She’s the greatest wife. Every time I come home, she makes me tea and thanks me for working all day."
"How did she fix her sadness?"
"None of the hospitals could help. But we just kept praying together."

(Naivasha, Kenya)

22 August 2014
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"She shares her yogurt with me."

(Nairobi, Kenya)

22 August 2014
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"I first learned that I was crippled when I was eight. We played a game in the yard where we would race and do somersaults. When even the youngest kids beat me, I knew I had a problem. Then when it was time to go to school, I was the only one who couldn’t go, because it was a very far walk."
"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"When I turned twenty, I had this moment where I realized that I hadn’t been able to get any education. And suddenly I knew that I’d probably never have a family."

(Nairobi, Kenya)

21 August 2014
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"My happiest moments were when my mom was still alive."
"What’s your fondest memory of your mother?"
"One time when I was six years old, we went to pick up my father at the airport. On the way, my mother explained to me the concept of boarding a plane and taking a trip. And then while we waited for my father, we sat in a nearby restaurant, and we planned out all the imaginary trips that I wanted to go on."

(Nairobi, Kenya)

21 August 2014
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"What’s your favorite thing about your brother?"
"He does all the work."

(Limuru, Kenya)

21 August 2014
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"I was about to leave for work the other day, so I stopped in her room to wake her up. And the first thing she said was: ‘Dad, I need a surprise.’ 
I said: ‘You need a what?’
She said: ‘I need a surprise.’ 
So I ran to the store and got her a doll, brought it to her, and went to work.”

(Nairobi, Kenya)

21 August 2014
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"When we graduate, my friend and I want to start an organization to teach people in rural areas how to read. I was volunteering at a clinic last year, and I saw a child die of Cholera because the mother couldn’t remember the prescription instructions."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

21 August 2014
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"What’s your biggest dream?"
"To be the mother of a doctor, the mother of a minister, and the mother of an engineer."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

21 August 2014
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"It’s always been my dream to have a successful business. I’d like one day to open more stores, and maybe even expand into the provinces. But the conditions are very difficult to start a business. Taxes are very high and services are very limited. The electricity was out for eleven days last month, but I still had to pay for thirty days. And when I try to use a generator, the costs are so high that the customers stop coming. It’s very difficult."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

20 August 2014
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"I’m embarrassed to say this, but I’ll say it. I’ve had a really hard time finding work, so I’ve been living with my grandmother. And she’s told me recently that she doesn’t have the money to feed me. So I’ve been eating at my friend’s house. I go over there, and I’m too embarrassed to ask for anything, but his dad always insists. He says: ‘Why aren’t you eating? Please, eat!’ This has really caused my idea of ‘family’ to widen. I’ve learned that your family can be anyone."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

20 August 2014
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"It’s very difficult to get a job on the basis of your education. All the people who have jobs to give, give it to their family. Not only does it benefit their family members, but it benefits them as well, because now they have less dependents."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

20 August 2014
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"I want to discover the cure for Ebola."

(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

20 August 2014
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"There is a stigma in this country around women with jobs. So I want to start an organization that provides girls in the Congo with examples of women around the world who have balanced family and career. Most men in this country think it’s only about money. They think: ‘If I make enough money for us to live, then my wife should take care of the children.’ The common belief is that a woman who works is hurting her children. People don’t realize that children also gain from the knowledge and experiences of their mother."
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

20 August 2014
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"What’s the score?"
"2 - 0"
"Who scored the goals?"
"I scored them both."
(Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo)

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